Grammar Guru: 3 Mistakes that Marketing Writers Make & How to Avoid Them

As a marketing writer, you have a tricky job.

Taking a topic that is bland and making it seem appealing is probably not covered in any marketing writing training you’ve had.  But if you remove these common mistakes from your marketing writing, you’ll be left with crisp copy that keeps readers on the page.

1. Ditching the Outline

Outlining might bring back unwanted memories from grammar school, but it can make your writing more cohesive.

Some writers find it’s best to jot down a few quick points they want to cover and fill in the introduction and conclusion later. Others have learned that getting a rough introduction or conclusion penned helps flesh out those points when they sit down to finish a piece.

2. Including Generic Words

In an effort to describe a product or service, you might find yourself using generic words. Before turning in copy, give it a grammar check and look for words like “quite,” “amazing” and “very.” You don’t have to revert to being a grammar nazi, but your copy will be punchier and read better if you eliminate these types of words.

3. Not Connecting With an Audience

Keeping the reader on the site and compelling them to make a purchase is the dream of every marketing writer. But doing this requires thinking like your audience. Developing a persona is one of the easiest ways of understanding what your audience needs.

About the author

Katie S has been writing for many years, either for academic reasons or for her own pleasure. She has been a freelance writer, concentrating on crafting concise, interesting and exciting copy for a variety of clients in many different industries, including the fields of law, medicine, sports and more.